About your Search

20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in it because it has aspects that have piqued our interest, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make an expensive city more affordable to more people, how to utilize the strengths of the city as a great tourist city. how we can get more folks to come and experience the wonders of the city. maybe they will make their stake here. these panel members have decided to make their stake here. they risked reputation, may be small amounts of money. if they had a lot of money, they may not have had to start this. they have also done it for the right reasons. they want to experience the city in a different way, but one that is in the tradition of san francisco and is reflective of mine, welcoming more people to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the
century relations to new 21st century -- to the new 21st century economy. as the mayor said, new research and dialogue are needed. that is why the sharing economy working group and the panel today make so much sense. i want to add one more thing before we go to the panel discussion. these facts may be intellectually stimulating or inspiring, but they do not really speak honestly to my heart. this is what brought me to the sharing economy. what i was after was a new way to live in a way that i felt i could live fully. what excites me about sharing is how it changes every day like for the better. it empowers us. the economic shift in the new businesses of creating and exchanging value is creating a new cultural narrative. it is replacing an old legacy narrative that was toxic. it told us the go live comes from shopping and competition -- it told us the good life comes from shopping in competition, from being free from each other. we are leading ving this because it has pushed us to the brink of extinction. it has enslaved as to debt. it is boring. it is spiritually empty. there is
to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals just with the kit and may never meet the people they are sharing with. we tried to encourage the parties to get to know each other, trying to just display your interest or so many things i can think of that our websites due to show who this person really is. they take their photo. i think part of this is about trust, and it is about letting -- the things we do to encourage trust and the things you do as a responsible member of the sharing community to insure you are doing your due diligence as well. when two people -- first off, the one example i want to bring is that a lot of our ca
business. >> okay. the resulting economy has resulted in internet base for short term rentals and many of the rentals are illegal and the hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize some or all of the arrangements and collect a hotel tax and we will begin with you -- i will be glad to repeat the question. >> i honestly don't know how you would enforce a law like that. of course everyone should pay their fair share but i don't know how you could enforce that. i believe we should standardize the inlaw units, maybe sure they're up to code and regulate any new units but as far as taxation i cannot see how you could actually enforce that and collect the taxes on it. >> thank you sir. mr. yee. >> cheryl i just want to make sure -- >> i can repeat it. there is internet base market for short base rentals and they sublease units to visitors and tourists and many are illegal and the city's hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize these arrangements and collect the hotel tax? >> i traveled to different countries and i go to the internet and they have hotels and these renta
of the economy, the consumer, the investment and the government. the only reason thing that has grown on a rapid rate is the government. the government gets their revenues through taxation or borrowing money. the problem is the regulations are hurting small businesses. 2/3 of all jobs are created by small business which are considered -- chapter s corporations and less than $250,000 killing all of the regulations and kill the incentive. the government doesn't produce anything. it's the private sector that produces the wealth and the opportunity. get the government off the back through regulations and taxation and you will see the city once again be vibrant. i'm telling you it's taxation and regulations. i have two successful businesses. i would not open another one in san francisco. i would not. >> thank you. mr. yee. >> here's the four things i would do to create jobs. number one, help the small businesses with a one stot shop approach. ocean avenue had a fire. nine businesses had a fire and the mayor came and if he could do that one time we could do that all the time and number two
agree with him and the issue that is largest faces us in san francisco are the economy and there are two parts to that and creating jobs and trying to get an economy going that is sustainable and can take care of the unfunded liabilities that we have that are so large. we have $323 million in unfunded liabilities for our health care, and i agree with him again on the pension issue. we absolutely have to do something about it. what i would imagine what we have to do is examine whether or not we need to find benefits or contributions, maybe we need people to retire at a later age, whether people continue to retire and have the pay at $300,000 rather than 150. >> thank you sir. ms. gavin. >> for me the issue in regards to policy that i think many of us know is malfeasance and corruption at city hall. i think that the back room deals that city hall is doing adversely impacts every person in this room. i don't know if you are aware we have not had a sunshine committee in the past four months, and sunshine gives all the right to redress government and it's our open government that you the
for leadership? i want to focus on our economy. i want to grow job opportunities for the students that are graduating our high schools. they are now graduating, beginning to graduate with requirements. they are totally prepared to take on this high wages, high-paying jobs such as biotech and the tech companies. so, now that they're ready, we have to have the jobs ready for them. and i'm more than willing to work with our business partners to create new jobs. the other thing i i'm going to be focusing on will be that i want to make sure our streets and our homes are safe. i in particular want to spend much of my time making sure that our pedestrians, in particular seniors and little children, are safe when they cross the street. this is very personal to me, very, very personal. six years ago i was hit by a car and almost died and now whenever somebody talks about pedestrian safety, my ears perk up. i am norman yee. i'm running for district 7 supervisor. i will come in with a strong independent voice that district 7 voters want. i will be there for you. i am beholden to only the mem
. but most importantly we have to grow the economy. and so there are a host of host of measures in each of those areas that are absolutely critical for our future and they are not easy decisions to be making but we have to make them sooner rather than later. because if you just pass the buck, it is the next generation who is going to be holding the bag. and in my mind, that is why i am running. it is really to look out for the children who are not voters, who are not being actually considered in my mind as much as they should. >> thank you. >> mr., chig how would you address the state's financial problems? >> we are about a hundred billion dollar budget here in california. we spent about a hundred billion and we bring in $80 billion revenue and that is a $20 billion budget gap, the fastest way for that is to grow jobs, we created clean, green collared jobs and brought jobs from overseas here into san francisco. she is are models that we can take to continue to grow our economy. unfortunately that is not going to be enough. we have to also look at ways to raise revenue, that is why i am
. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we also are using technology to join our private companies in hiring san franciscans. hopefully some of your kids, some of your grandkids as well, are going to enjoy some of these great jobs in san francisco, because the companies that are here, many of them have agreed to use the virtual hiring practice called hiresf.org and share the technology to hire online send franciscans. we're doing the right here in our great city. i have
interests of our small businesses. which are the life blood of the san francisco economy 80% of our economy is small business along our commercial corridors and most jobs are created by small businesses each year. the city needs to reorient its economic polices towards small businesses and start to remove the red tape and stream-lining the permitting process and other ways to facilitate small businesses to thrive and survive in san francisco. so my no. 1 priority is reorienting our economic polices away from the cronyism, the power elect elite and back to the small businesses. >> i was born and raised in the district. that is not why i think you should vote for me as your supervisor. my entire life was been committed to this district starting when i worked for the mayor where women were trained i know what good social services look like, but i understand that we can't exclude people because they are rich. we can't exclude people because they are middle-class at the expense of making sure we're taking care of one class of people. i worked really hard and there were a lot of people that hel
's how we build the local economy with small business. >> all right. mr. garcia. >> joe is right. we need to change the landscape and how we do business. we have decided that process is product here in san francisco. we tend to defy the code and vilify the individual who is trying to get a business started. we are not business friendly. in 2004 the city of san francisco passed prop i and required that the city do economic analysis every four years and strategy report. talks about how we improve the economy and one thing we are trying to change to the gross receipt tax and that is a start but we have to press this and business friendly city and benefit those in business and benefit those in need of job when is we have 8% unemployment here in san francisco. >> thank you sir. ms. gavin. >> i would invest in transportation, in public transportation it would be muni. i think a lot of areas that we need to upgrade muni and put it under ground. i would invest in the ferries. i think being a tourist city and many people commute to the city i think it's one area a lot of jobs would com
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
in one of the most competitive sectors, san francisco economy, managing several hundred contracts and generating 1.3 billion in wages. in lead he ship with stagehands i played a vital role as president of the public utilities commission, and a member of the chamber of commerce. during my time as president with the puc, i managed the time on budget, the largest infrastructure project of the generation. and the 4.6 billion hetch hetchy project that ensures the protection of our water sister. during my time in the port commission i led the charge of the development of the james r. herman cruise terminal which serves multiple purposes by creating jobs and protecting the industry that has been part of the backbone for the port and part of the future in terms of fishing transportation and mobile goods and services. i have no ambition for any other than this job as district 7. i was born in the district, graduated from here, i lived in san francisco my entire life. i raised my family here. i know the people and residents, not just my district, but the entire city. i would be an excellent
, that winning means generations of kids win. our economy wins. what i think are things that we do well. all of so many other aspects of our society win out when we use these opportunities and invite a lot more to come together and think creatively as we are the innovation capital of the world. we will continue to do that and continue to invite more partners to be our partners in this great event. go sf super bowl! [applause] >> mayor lee, it is an honor to be chairing this committee. we won't be able to do this without you so thank you for your support today. we have a lot of folks around us. and one silverstein. [ laughter] >> all about rich. i just want to say thank you to the team at goodby silverstein, the social media campaign. you have worked incredibly hard. rich, your team is amazing. come up here and tell everybody about the logo and the campaign. [applause] >> we have to win this. we are not in it to come in second. we've got to win it. i challenge anyone to have better looking goal posts than that. we have remarkable area. we have a great group of people. the logo really reflects
to be participating in our great economy in san francisco we have to find a way for better transportation routes to transfer people up north and down south of the city, and when we call ourselves a city as a transit first city there is no better example than that than what is reflected in the plans for the central subway. this project is a vital enhancement of our public transportation system. it's going to significantly improve the movement of tens of thousands of franciscans and if you were here this past weekend when people were predicting it would be jam san francisco instead of san francisco you knew that folks were educated because of the great leadership at our mta, our county transportation, all of our transit systems and were at the highest level of educating the visitors and others to use public transportation. it will work for all of us and as we build the housing units we identified in hunter's point and treasure island and welcome more people to our great city and we are growing as a result. we are going to have the greatest subway system that can connect to our bart, to our cal
conviction, especially in a down economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can show that drug use rates are quite similar in all different ethnic communities and african-americans are 13 times greater likelihood of being convicted of a felony of simple possession. then of course there's also the savings that we could experience, nonpartisan, independent legislative analyst office has determined that there would be $159 million annually of savings at the county level, plus another $65 million annually in savings at the state level. and our bill would direct a portion of that savings to drug treatment programs so that we can, like these 13 other states, have better outcomes, safer communities. i of course have to thank the sponsors of our bill, and we have a number of them, the h.l.u. which has been a champion an
) and the way that we think about is it an incubator in the government. it is not to incubate the economy, it is to execute projects and it is actually... (inaudible) program and the present priorities. one such program that is really focused up to date is presidential innovations for... shall we go through... okay. so, then and as an effort that, really have the idea for, basically made... and the whole idea is an amazing... and the government to work with all of the innovators on game-changing that they can actually move forward and... money, and improve it in the lives of americans. and the idea is that the teams work in (inaudible) in part of and deliver... within six months. and so not as a... powerpoint or... actual out come and actual change. and they are... the american people. what we actually did was in the version of a traditional (inaudible) and actually... what we did instead was the ground force from within the government a set of... funded by agencies that did (inaudible) external folks to come in and help. in fact, people competed for the right to pay for both. they were a
and working with target we can actually deliver them and this is the prochgz a good economy brings. this is what working with business is all about. it's what working with corporate citizens like target is all about and the jobs are here not only because of target but you have shown a great effort with our schools. the backpack give give a way program was exciting with the schools and the grants and it's a wonderful time to work with you as a corporate citizen so i look forward to a great icon of a city target store here. it is part of a brand news revised buildings and restaurants in the grownt floor and meeting spaces -- i think i will hold a few fundraisers up top with that city view and fun to do and of course when my wife says "we haven't seen a movie later" we will get down here and it has it all here. we welcome target for being here. we thank you for your corporate partnership and the partnership on the hiring and we look forward to a great partnership for years to come and west field and united way of the bay area and i want to say thank you to the wonderful team. th
that will drive a dynamic local economy and i think that's the key. >> all right. >> it seems as though we're all avoiding the question, and that is what new fees and what new taxes should we impose and i guess that's because we're all reluctant to do that and we feel the better way is figure out new sources of revenue for the city, so i agree that we need to do things that would enhance the quality of life in san francisco and draw more tourists and expand that center and we're turning away dollars to the city. we need a new facility and we don't have one currently for that and we need to streamline the planning process. i spent seven years on the board of appeals and there are things sitting in the pipeline and create necessary jobs and revenue and we're not taking advantage of that and we need to do things at increased revenue and i am reluctant to talk about imposing new fees and taxes. >> ms. gavin. >> i would say one of the things that we have to do would be close the loop holes that we give big business. they come here and they say they're going to provide jobs and jobs and the jobs don'
, the economy will stop. we did a major outreach. we trained an outreach team, who went to every community meeting, to educate people on how bad the crisis was. not only did i tell people that we'd have to raise rates, i told them we'd have to tear up the city to repair this infrastructure. man: you can't simply say, "i won't use any water, it's too expensive." we have about 25% of our population that's at or below the poverty line, so you have to look at rate structures that are tiered so the people can pay their bills. franklin: we would love to have something like 75% federal money. we do get some federal aid and we are thankful, but on the other hand, we're paying for this primarily with new rates. we have increased our rates to among the highest in america. but not nearly as much as if we hadn't passed a one-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have cle
interest. we need to reorient our city's development policies to focus on the 80 percent of the economy which is our small businesses or mom and pop shops. san francisco needs to develop more affordable housing. the association of bay government says that they need 18,000 new units of housing and we are nowhere close to that. prop c, something that i encourage you to vote for, but let's go back to the ballot in the years to come and pass an affordable housing bond something that san francisco has not done in close to two decades. we need to improve our public schools in san francisco if we are going to be a family and child-friendly city. prop 13 has starved our schools of funding across the state of california and in san francisco for decades. commercial property owners have been on a tax holiday through the reagan and bush era and have received benefits it is time for us to properly tax commercial property owners here in san francisco so that we can make-up for the lack of funding that we receive from the state. i plan to do that by instituting a commercial rent tax in san francisco.
career to another. mid career as a result of the changing economy so that they can get new skills that they will need and for younger people who want to get into the job market to help them to be able to get on a path that will get them that bachelor's degree. >> i agree with the senator that the retraining is a important aspect of the educational system here. i think city college here in san francisco falls into entirely different category or problems that don't afflict some of the other community colleges around the state. beyond that, however, we have to recognize that college in and off itself is not necessarily suitable for all students and we have to recognize that at an earlier age, we should have more vocational type of training tracks in our high school education as well. people want to go straight from high school into auto mechanic or green jobs such as installing solar technology, things like that. that should be an option, as well. i think that it is a fallacy that every citizen or every resident of california needs to have a college education. >> so i have a question
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)